Daytrip to special Airport of St. Barth

November 11, 2019

Gustaf III Airport (IATA: SBH, ICAO: TFFJ) also known as Saint Barthélemy Airport, Rémy de Haenen Airport, sometimes as St. Jean Airport (French: Aérodrome de St Jean), is a public use airport located in the village of St. Jean on the Caribbean island of Saint Barthélemy. Both the airport and the island's main town of Gustavia are named after King Gustav III of Sweden, under whom Sweden obtained the island from France in 1784 (it was sold back to France in 1878).

 

In 1984, Swedish Minister of Communications, Hans Gustafsson, inaugurated the terminal building of the Gustaf III Airport. In 2015 the airport got the name Aéroport de Saint-Barthélemy-Rémy-de-Haenen, named after Rémy de Haenen, an aviation pioneer and later mayor of Saint Barthélemy. The airport is served by small regional commercial aircraft and charters. Most visiting aircraft carry fewer than twenty passengers, such as the Twin Otter, a common sight throughout the northern West Indies and as a curiosity, the Canadian-built de Havilland Dash 7 is the largest aircraft ever allowed to operate at this airport. The short airstrip is at the base of a gentle slope ending directly on the beach. The arrival descent is extremely steep over the hilltop traffic circle; departing planes fly right over the heads of sunbathers (although small signs advise sunbathers not to lie directly at the end of the runway). The airport is located at the island's second-largest town, St. Jean. The most common aircraft flying in for commercial service are the Pilatus PC-12, Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, de Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter, and Britten-Norman BN-2 Islander, among others.

 

 All Photos are Coypright by Martin Rogosz

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon

Last Update: 16.08.2020

© 2020 by Christoph and Martin Rogosz. Created with Wix.com

WARNING: If you download one of our photos, you agree that in case the photo is unauthorisedly used for other purposes such as advertisements, magazines and all other forms of commercial or publicity use, the amount of 5000 Euros (five thousand Euros) per photo will be charged to whoever is using the photo and the user may also face criminal charges for unauthorized use of the photo. In case of copyright theft of one of our photos (if you use any of our photos as being yours), the amount of 10000 Euros (ten thousand Euros) per photo will be charged to you and you will may also face criminal charges for copyright theft.